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Financial Aid Regulations 2014-2015

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IX-Y UNDERGRADUATE -FINANCIAL AID REGULATIONS — FEDERAL, STATE, AND INSTITUTIONAL

Graduate students – please visit www.clarkson.edu/sas/financial/graduate  for Graduate Aid information.

A. Clarkson University Awarding Policy

Clarkson University bases its Financial Aid Program on two comprehensive criteria: 

  1. Financial need as determined from the results of the FAFSA, and
  2. Academic achievement.

Students applying for need based federal, state and institutional aid must file a FAFSA each year.

Students applying for federal loans and parents applying for the Federal Direct Parent Loan (PLUS) are required to file a FAFSA.

Students receiving only academic/merit based aid are not required to submit a FAFSA.

Adjustments to offers of Financial Aid may result from the following:

  1. Retention - Scholarship and grants are retained by the student provided he/she is able to comply with the conditions for retention as described on the "Financial Aid Notification" (FAN)
  2. Verification - Per federal regulations, information on the FAFSA will be compared to the information submitted on the Clarkson Financial Aid Verification Form. Resolution of conflicting information may result in an adjustment to the assistance offered.
  3. Request for Information - Any requests for information must be responded to by the deadline indicated on the request. Failure to respond with the necessary information may result in an adjustment to the assistance offered.
  4. Receipt of a final, official high school transcript - No federal, state or institutional financial aid will be disbursed to a student's account without the submission of a final, official high school transcript.
  5. Necessity of Check-in at the beginning of the semester - No federal, state or institutional financial aid will be disbursed to a student's account until after they have "checked in." Check-in must be completed by the end of the 1st week of the semester. Failure to check-in will result in the cancellation of the financial aid award package.
  6. Changes in Enrollment - if a student's enrollment drops below full-time during the drop period, the financial aid offer will be revised for less than full-time status. Pell grants will be pro-rated. Students lose eligibility for TAP and all Clarkson need and non-need based grants, scholarships and loans. Direct Loan eligibility will be re-evaluated.

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B.  Federal Aid

Federal aid includes the Pell Grant, the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), the Federal Direct Student Loan Program, the Federal Direct PLUS Loan, the Federal Perkins Loan and Federal Work-Study.   SEOG, Perkins and Federal Work-Study awards are based on the level of funding received annually from the US Department of Education.  Awards are made on a first come, first serve basis and amounts may vary from year to year.

In order to be eligible to receive any Title IV financial aid, a matriculated student must meet one of the following criteria:

  1. Be a high school graduate - a student must submit a final official high school transcript in order to receive federal funds. Aid will not be disbursed to a student’s account until this document is received.
  2. Have earned a recognized General Equivalency Diploma (GED)

NOTE: Students are ineligible for all federal aid if they owe a refund or repayment of any previously received Title IV funds or are in default on a previously received federal student loan.

Enrollment - Full time Undergraduate students must register for at least 12 credit hours per semester. Part-time students must register for at least six (6) hours.

Students must submit a FAFSA each year they are in school.

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C. Clarkson University Grants, Loans and Scholarships

Clarkson University offers various need based and non need (merit) based grants, loans and scholarships.

In order to have eligibility determined for need based grants and loans, students must file the FAFSA form and if selected, complete the verification process each year.

Students must register for at least 12 credits hours each semester and have full-time status at the end of the drop period.  Only one course per semester that a student has already passed and received credit for, may be repeated and counted towards full-time enrollment status for financial aid eligibility.

Scholarships are retained each year provided that the student meets Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid.  Some Endowed and Sponsored Scholarships have additional criteria. Most scholarships are limited to 8 semesters.

Institutionally sponsored loans are awarded annually based on a review of individual circumstances. Renewal of these loans is dependent upon funding availability, continued demonstrated financial need and satisfactory academic progress.

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D.  Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards for Federal and Institutional Financial Aid

The US Department of Education has issued new Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) requirements effective July 1, 2011.  These requirements are part of the Program Integrity Final Regulations issued on October 29, 2010. 

The revised Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) policy that follows includes the requirements of the Program Integrity Regulations and is effective at the beginning of the Fall 2011 term. Federal regulations require institutions to evaluate Financial Aid SAP at the end of the Fall, Spring and Summer terms.   Both full-time and part-time enrollment status must be evaluated as well as periods of enrollment during which the student did not receive financial aid.  

All students are encouraged to become familiar with the policy as eligibility for federal and institutional aid may be an important factor in being able to continue one’s education at Clarkson.

Students must maintain SAP to retain eligibility for federal and institutional financial aid.   SAP is comprised of three areas as required by federal regulations.  A student must complete their degree within a specified period, demonstrate PACE by earning a minimum percentage of attempted credit hours and maintain a cumulative GPA that is consistent with meeting graduation requirements.  Some institutional scholarships (i.e. Honors, Endowed and Sponsored Scholarships) may require higher academic achievement than the standards outlined in this section. Students with questions regarding specific scholarships are advised to contact their Student Administrative Services (SAS) representative.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards for Financial Aid are based on a student’s cumulative record and are separate from Academic Standing determinations.  A student who is on academic warning, academic probation, or has been approved to continue after separation retains financial aid eligibility provided the Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards for Financial Aid  (detailed below) are met. 

1. Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion

Federal regulations specify that a student must complete his/her degree within 150% of the published length of the program.  The maximum time frame at Clarkson is measured in attempted hours. A student must earn 120 credits to receive a Bachelor’s degree.  Therefore, to retain financial aid eligibility, the maximum time frame to complete the program for full time students cannot exceed 180 attempted credit hours, 6 years, or 12 terms, whichever comes first.  A part-time student cannot exceed 180 attempted credit hours.  A student pursuing a second Bachelor’s degree with the first Bachelor’s degree must complete the additional required coursework within the 150% time frame period.  There are no appeals to the maximum time frame policy.

Credits counted in the maximum time are all attempted credits and include:

  • Earned hours – Passed (A-D), Pass (P)
  • Repeated Courses – all attempts – refer to the REPEATED COURSE section for detailed information.
  • Withdrawal (LW) and (W) - Maximum time frame regulations do not allow for the exclusion of courses in which a student has remained past the drop period and earned a grade of ‘W”.
  • Failure (F)
  • Incomplete (I)
  • All accepted transfer credits (including consortium agreements & Study-Abroad courses) &test credit (T)
  • All courses attempted at Clarkson, even if they are not used to meet degree requirements.

2. PACE Standards

PACE is defined by federal regulations as steady progress towards degree completion within the 150% time frame. 

Clarkson is required to measure a student’s PACE as a percentage as indicated below:                                 

Cumulative # of Earned Hours

Cumulative # of Attempted Hours

Earned credit hours include:

  • Grades of A, B, C, D or P (with credit)
  • All accepted transfer credits and (including consortium agreements & Study Abroad courses) & test credits (T)

Attempted credit hours include:              

  • Earned hours – Passed (A-D), Pass (P)                    
  • Repeated Courses – all attempts – refer to the REPEATED COURSE section for detailed information.
  • Withdrawal (LW) and (W) - PACE regulations do not allow for the exclusion of courses in which a student has remained past the drop period and earned a grade of 'W'.
  • Failure (F)
  • Incomplete (I)
  • All accepted transfer credits (including consortium agreements & Study Abroad courses) and test credit (T)
  • All courses attempted at Clarkson, even if they are not used to meet degree requirements.

The chart below indicates the PACE required to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid.

New Transfer students are placed on the chart based on the number of transfer credits that have been accepted by Clarkson. 

PACE Chart

Cumulative Attempted Credit Hours PACE- Minimum required percentage of earned credit hours divided by attempted credit hours
0-18 50%
19-36 50%
37-54 67%
55-72 67%
73-180 67%

3. Qualitative Standards – Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA)

Federal regulations require the student to meet minimum cumulative GPA standards to retain eligibility for aid.  As indicated in the following chart, after 4 semesters a student must maintain a 2.0 cumulative GPA to be eligible for financial aid. 

Grades earned in prior attempts of repeated courses are excluded from the GPA calculation.

The chart below indicates the GPA required to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid

Transfer students are placed on the GPA chart based on the number of semesters they have attended Clarkson.

GPA Chart

End of Semester Minimum GPA Required at the end of Semester
First 1.00
Second 1.40
Third 1.75
Fourth-Twelfth 2.00

WARNING TERM

A student who does not meet both the PACE and GPA standards is not making Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid. The student is notified by the Financial Aid Office that he/she is on Financial Aid Warning for the subsequent term of attendance.  During the Financial Aid Warning Term, the student retains eligibility for both federal and institutional aid.

A student who meets both the PACE and GPA standards at the conclusion of the Financial Aid Warning Term is again meeting Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid and is eligible for federal and institutional aid for the subsequent term of attendance.

A student who does not meet both the PACE and GPA standards at the conclusion of the Financial Aid Warning Term is notified by the Financial Aid Office that he/she is not making Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid and is ineligible for federal and institutional aid.  The student is also notified of the Appeal Process. 

A student may have more than one Financial Aid Warning Term; however they may not be consecutive.

APPEAL PROCESS

A student may file an appeal based on catastrophic or extraordinary circumstances “beyond the student’s control,” such as personal illness or injury, or the death, illness or injury of a family member, relative or close personal friend. A student is allowed to appeal once based on a change of major and once due to severe adjustment issues as a freshman or new transfer student provided that the appeal is needed based on performance after the first two terms of attendance. 

There are 3 required elements of an appeal:

  1. A written statement from the student - Federal regulations require a student who is requesting an appeal to submit a written statement explaining:
    1. Why the student was not able to meet the satisfactory academic progress standards.
    2. What has changed that will allow the student to meet the standards at the conclusion of the academic plan (see #3 below).
  2. Supporting documentation - A student requesting an appeal must submit supporting documentation such as a physician’s written statement to substantiate illness or accident, a copy of a death certificate or newspaper obituary, a written statement from clergy, family member(s), or other third party familiar with the student’s situation, or a written statement from an academic advisor, professor or counselor.
  3. Development of an Academic Plan - As part of the appeal, the student must work with a Program Administrator to develop an academic plan.  The academic plan is designed to enable the student to meet both PACE and GPA standards at the conclusion of the plan. An academic plan may entail one or more terms and includes specific requirements the student must achieve.  Although the student is not making satisfactory academic progress, federal and institutional aid is reinstated for one term.

A student interested in filing an appeal must begin the process by contacting the Dean of Students at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the term he/she wishes to receive financial aid.

A student filing an appeal must authorize the release of pertinent information as part of an investigation of the facts concerning the failure to meet satisfactory academic progress standards.

Each appeal will be investigated and reviewed by the Dean of Students in conjunction with faculty members from the student’s program of study as well as other Clarkson University personnel as necessary.

The Dean of Students will make a recommendation to approve or deny the appeal and notify the Office of Financial Aid.  The Director of Financial Aid will make the final decision to approve or deny the appeal.

The Office of Financial Aid will notify the student by letter or e-mail of the final decision.

Upon approval of an appeal including an academic plan the student is placed on Financial Aid Probation for the next term of attendance.

At the end of the Financial Aid Probationary term, the student will be evaluated according to the requirements specified in the academic plan.  Provided that the student is successfully meeting the conditions of the plan, the student may continue to receive federal and institutional aid for the subsequent term.  In cases in which an academic plan includes more than one term, the student will be evaluated at the end of each term. If the student continues to meet the requirements of the plan, the student remains eligible for financial aid.

A student who does not meet the conditions of the academic plan or whose appeal is denied is no longer eligible for federal and institutional aid at Clarkson until both standards are met.   A student who is ineligible for aid may regain eligibility by:

  1. Taking courses at Clarkson without receiving federal or institutional aid that raises their  GPA  to the minimum standards and/or increases earned hours to the minimum PACE  requirements.  The student must contact their SAS representative at the end of the term to request an evaluation of their financial aid satisfactory academic progress standing and financial aid eligibility.
  2. Transferring in course credit - A transferred course must count toward degree requirements. A minimum of a “C” is required for transfer credits.  Transfer credits are included in both attempted and earned hours.  Transfer credits for repeated courses may have an effect on the GPA.  Transfer credits for non-repeated courses have no effect on the GPA.  Transfer credits must be received by the 10th day of the term in order to be used in the SAP determination for that term.  Transfer credits received after the 10th day of the term will have no effect on a student’s SAP status for the term.

REPEATED COURSES

Courses in which a grade of F or W is recorded on a student’s transcript may be repeated a maximum of 2 times.  

The earned hours are counted once.

The attempted hours are counted each time and may be used to establish full-time enrollment status.  

The student may receive financial aid for these course repeats. 

Courses in which a student has previously earned credit (A, B, C, D):

  • Federal regulations allow a student to repeat a course once if the student previously earned credit for the course. The repeated course(s) will be used toward full-time enrollment status and are eligible for financial aid.  Courses repeated more than once will not count toward enrollment status and are ineligible for financial aid. More than one course may be repeated per term.  This does not apply to students receiving International Scholarships. 
  • The attempted hours are counted each time.
  • The earned hours are counted once.
  • The grade from the prior completion(s) is excluded from the GPA calculation.

ACADEMIC GRADE CHANGES AND INCOMPLETES

For purposes of determining SAP for federal and institutional financial aid, all grade changes including incompletes must be submitted to SAS prior to the 10th day of the subsequent term.  This deadline may differ from academic departmental guidelines.  The student must contact their SAS representative to request a recalculation of SAP.  Any academic grade changes occurring after the 10th day of the term will have no effect on a student’s SAP status for that term.

READMITTED STUDENTS

A student who has left the University for one or more terms and has been readmitted will have Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid reviewed at the time of readmission.  Transfer credits must be received prior to the 10th day of the term in order to be included in the SAP determination.

If the student is determined to be meeting SAP, federal and institutional aid will be offered provided the student meets all other eligibility requirements.

If it is determined that the student is not meeting SAP, the student will be notified by letter of his/her status and the appeal process.

There is no guarantee that a readmitted student will receive the same type or amount of institutional aid they received during prior terms. 

E. TOTAL WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY - FEDERAL TITLE IV AND INSTITUTIONAL AID REFUND POLICY

There are occasions when a student may leave the University prior to the completion of a term.  If a student officially withdraws from the University , takes a leave of absence, unofficially withdraws or is dismissed during the semester, for the purposes of financial aid both situations are treated as a withdrawal.

A student intending to leave the University must contact the Office of Student Affairs to begin the withdrawal process.

The law specifies how Clarkson must determine the amount of the Title IV program assistance that you earn if you withdraw from school. The Title IV programs that are covered by this law are: Federal Pell Grants, Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grants, Federal Direct Student Loans, PLUS loans, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) and Federal Perkins Loans.

When you withdraw from the University during the semester, the amount of Title IV program assistance that you have earned up to that point in time is determined by a specific formula.  If you received less assistance than the amount that you earned, you may be able to receive those additional funds.  If you received more assistance than you earned, the excess funds must be returned to the US Department of Education.

The amount of assistance that you have earned is determined on a pro rata basis. The formula is based upon the number of days the student has attended as a percentage of the total number of days in the semester.   For example, if you completed 30% of the semester, you earn 30% of the assistance you were originally awarded.  Once you have completed more than 60% of the semester, you have earned all of the assistance that you were awarded for the semester.   Federal regulations require this calculation if the student officially or unofficially withdraws, is dismissed or otherwise leaves the University during a semester

Student transcripts are reviewed at the conclusion of each semester.  If a student received all “F” grades during a semester, federal regulations require the Office of Financial Aid to obtain additional information from the Academic Department(s). If the Academic Department(s) determines that the student completed yet failed to meet the course objectives in at least one course, no changes to the student’s financial aid for that semester is required.  If however, the Academic Department(s) determines that the student did not complete all courses (i.e. stopped attending all courses); the student is considered to have unofficially withdrawn from the University.  In this case, the last date of an academic related activity (i.e. documented attendance in class, submission of a homework assignment or the taking of an exam) is used to determine the date of the unofficial withdrawal.  If the last date of an academic related activity is after the 60% date of the semester, no adjustment to a student’s financial aid for that semester is required.  If however, the date occurs prior to the 60% date, a Title IV refund calculation is required and necessary adjustments to a student’s financial aid for the semester will be made.  In absence of a documented last date of an academic related activity, federal regulations require Clarkson to use the midpoint (50%) of the semester.

The Federal Title IV Refund Procedure is separate and distinct from the Office of Student Account’s refund policy for tuition, fees and other charges at Clarkson.  Therefore, a student may still owe funds to cover unpaid institutional charges.

Clarkson scholarships, grants and loans aid will be reduced based on individual circumstances, the date of withdrawal and the Student Account Refund Policy.

Satisfactory Academic Progress for students who return to the University for a subsequent semester will be reviewed and a determination will be made based on the Maximum Time Frame, PACE and GPA standards as stated above.

F. NEW YORK STATE AID

New York State aid includes the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP), Veteran Scholarships and other merit based scholarships.  NYS Legal Residency is required. For dependent students, parent NYS residency is also required. 

Students must apply for TAP and other state scholarships at www.hesc.com after filing the FAFSA. The amount of the award is determined by the TAP division of the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation (HESC). Students are notified directly by HESC of the amount of their award.

TAP can only be credited toward tuition charges. For students who receive other tuition only scholarships or grants, the total of TAP and the other aid cannot exceed the tuition charge.

TAP and other scholarships require matriculation in a degree program and enrollment in a minimum of 12 credits per semester.  Students whose enrollment status is less than full-time at the end of the drop period are ineligible for TAP for that term.

In order to receive TAP and scholarships a student must meet specific academic standards. Evaluations occur at the end of each semester. Good academic standing for TAP involves two components:

Pursuit of Program - HESC regulations require that a student receive a passing or failing grade in a certain percentage of courses each term, depending on the number of state awards the student has received. A completion for TAP includes the grades of A, B, C, D, and F.  During the first 2 semesters, a student must complete at least 50% of a full time load, during the 3rd and 4th semesters – 75% and in all subsequent semesters, a student must complete 100% of a full time load. Students who do not meet the pursuit of program requirements will lose good academic standing and are not eligible for an award for the next semester. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress - Effective July 1, 2011 New York State enacted revised regulations regarding satisfactory academic progress. The regulations changed the number of credits a student must accumulate and the cumulative grade point average that must be achieved each semester.  The chart that pertains to you depends upon the year you received your first TAP award and whether or not you are a HEOP student.  Please refer to the charts below:

The following chart must be used by all institutions for students who received their first TAP in 2007-2008 through and including 2009-2010 and HEOP students who received their first award in 2007-2008 and thereafter:

Calendar: Semester Program: Baccalaureate Program
Prior being certified for this payment:
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th* 10th*
A student must have accumulated this many credits:
0 3 9 21 33 45 60 75 90 105
With at least this grade point average:
0 1.1 1.2 1.3 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0


The following chart must be used by all 4 year institutions for students (excluding HEOP) who received their first TAP award in 2010-2011 and thereafter:

Calendar: Semester Program: Baccalaureate Program
Prior being certified for this payment:
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th** 10th**
A student must have accumulated this many credits:
0 6 15 27 39 51 66 81 96 111
With at least this grade point average:
0 1.5 1.8 1.8 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

Reinstatement of Good Academic Standing - students who have lost good academic standing may restore this standing in one of the following ways:

Make up past academic deficiencies by completing one or more semesters of student without receiving any state grants or scholarships.

Be readmitted to the school after an absence of at least one calendar year; or be granted a one-time waiver.

A student may not regain eligibility by changing their program of study.

NOTE: Students who lose good academic standing for failing to achieve a cumulative GPA of a 2.0 can regain eligibility by completing appropriate coursework without state support to achieve a 2.0. Students cannot regain eligibility by remaining out of school for a period of time. 

One-time TAP Waiver - regulations permit students to receive a one-time waiver of the good academic standing requirement as an undergraduate. Waivers may be issued for students who have experienced exceptional or extraordinary circumstances "beyond the student's control" that resulted in the failure to satisfy the requirements and where there is a reasonable expectation that the student will meet these requirements in the future. Circumstances may include, but are not limited to, the death of a student's relative or a student's personal illness or injury.  A change of major or severe adjustment issues are not acceptable circumstances for a TAP waiver.

Students who have lost TAP eligibility will be notified by the TAP Certifying Officer.  As part of the notification, students will be given information regarding the one-time TAP waiver regulations and requirements.

Students wishing to go forward with an appeal must complete and submit an Appeal Application with supporting documentation to the Dean of Students.

Students must authorize the release of pertinent information as part of an investigation of the facts concerning the failure to meet academic progress regulations.

Appeals will be investigated and reviewed by the Dean of Students in conjunction with faculty members from the student's program of study as well as other University personnel as necessary.

The Dean of Student will make a recommendation to approve or deny the appeal for a TAP waiver and will notify the Office of Financial Aid of the decision.  The Director of Financial Aid will make the final decision to approve or deny the appeal.

The Office of Financial Aid will notify the student by email or letter of the decision.

Other Scholarships awarded by HESC may have higher minimum GPA requirements.

Part-Time TAP - NY State Education Law has been amended to create Part-time TAP for students. To be eligible for this program, students must be freshman in the 2006-07 academic year or thereafter, have earned 12 credits or more in each of two-consecutive semesters, and maintain a "C" average.

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G. Cooperative Education Students

Students who are participating in the cooperative education program remain matriculated students at Clarkson University. For the semester that they are on COOP, tuition is not charged and no academic credit is earned. 

H. Outgoing Study Abroad/Exchange Students

Students participating in the study abroad/exchange program must apply for financial aid and if required, complete verification. Students are charged tuition at Clarkson University. Any credit in the student's account will be refunded to the student for housing costs incurred abroad. Students must enroll in and complete the equivalent of 12 credits at Clarkson.

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H. Outgoing Study Abroad/Exchange Students

Students participating in the study abroad/exchange program must apply for financial aid and if required, complete verification. Students are charged tuition at Clarkson University.  Any credit in the student's account will be refunded to the student for housing costs incurred abroad. Students must enroll in and complete the equivalent of 12 credits at Clarkson. 

I. Early Admission Students- The Clarkson School

All Early Admission students are required to fill out a Federal Aid Certification Form regarding his/her enrollment in high school. Students who are still enrolled in high school are ineligible for all federal aid.

The term "enrolled in high school" includes, but is not limited to, the concurrent pursuit of a high school diploma while enrolled in The Clarkson School. It also includes (i) a student who has completed the requirement for his/her high school diploma but not yet received it and is taking coursework for which his/her high school will give the student credit or (ii) a student who has not received a high school diploma and is considered by his/her high school to be enrolled, e.g. as a requirement for participation on an interscholastic sports team or in any other curricular or extracurricular activity for which enrollment in the high school is a prerequisite.

J. Drug Conviction Eligibility

If you answered "yes" to Question #23 on the FAFSA - "Have you been convicted for the possession or sale of illegal drugs for an offense that occurred while you were receiving federal student aid?" you will be sent a worksheet by the Dept of Education that will determine if your conviction will affect your eligibility for federal aid. If it is determined that you are ineligible for federal aid, you are also ineligible for institutional aid. Students who lose aid under the drug conviction regulations will be notified in writing by the Office of Financial Aid.

You may regain aid eligibility by completing an acceptable drug rehabilitation program or pass two unannounced drug tests administered by an acceptable drug rehabilitation program. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for the criteria governing an acceptable drug rehabilitation program.

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K. Athletic Financial Aid Recipients Code of Conduct

Scholar athletes who receive athletic financial assistance must be aware of their high visibility within the Clarkson community. It is essential that each student athlete exemplify the highest standard of personal conduct. This is especially true for those student athletes who represent Clarkson at the Division I level. To assist all athletes with special emphasis on those who receive athletic financial assistance, the Athletic Administration requires each student to abide by the following Athletic Code of Conduct. 

Student athletes must prioritize academics over athletics. To that end class attendance is mandatory. Should the need arise, procedures are available to have faculty notified of absences for legitimate reasons. 

Academic achievement levels are prescribed by both Clarkson and the NCAA as requirements for participation. Additionally the coaching staff, based upon feedback from the academic community may require mandatory study halls or other proactive measures designed to enhance student athlete academic performance. 

Each student athlete must be aware of the University code of ethics relative to academic integrity. Plagiarism and cheating are considered to be serious offenses, which must be brought before the Academic Integrity Committee. 

Student athletes must take great care to avoid all violations of the law, especially the abuse of alcohol and controlled substances. 

Each student athlete is expected to adhere to regulations governing life in the University residences. These regulations are published annually in the University Regulations. The Athletic Administration and appropriate coaching staff will review disciplinary actions taken by the Dean of Student’s Office against student athletes. Serious or repeat offenses may result in a serious misconduct finding against the student athlete. 

Honesty, above all else, is expected of each student athlete. 

Student athletes are reminded of the regulations relative to their required amateurism to be eligible for inter-collegiate competition. The receipt of athletic financial aid requires that the student athlete maintain their amateur status. 

Student athletes are reminded that athletic financial aid may be immediately withdrawn based upon serious misconduct, academic ineligibility, falsifying eligibility information, or actions compromising the student's amateur status. In addition, Clarkson Athletics advises student athletes that non-compliance with elements of the Code of Conduct will result in disciplinary actions. Should the offense involve legal sanctions, academic integrity or disciplinary action through normal university processes a finding of serious misconduct may be applied thereby causing cancellation of the student's athletic financial assistance. Should this occur the student, based upon NCAA guidelines, will be given the opportunity to request a hearing regarding the cancellation of their athletic financial assistance.

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L. The Financial Appeals Board

The Financial Appeals Board (FAB) is an administrative Committee appointed by the President to resolve student financial difficulties stemming from regulatory non compliance. The mission of the FAB is to provide a mechanism for regulatory discretion (adjustment) based upon individual student circumstances. The Committee is required to determine that "Progress and Pursuit" are being maintained prior to discretionary actions. 

Only students who have exhausted all other remedies would be able to appeal to FAB.

The FAB could elect at its discretion to hear typical cases involving medical or personal circumstances.

The FAB would decide individual appeals based on a majority vote with at least three members present.

Resolutions to a student's financial concerns are at the discretion of FAB and may involve either financial aid or adjustments to student charges.

Referrals to the FAB are to be coordinated through any of the following offices: Academic Affairs, Vice President for University Outreach and Student Affairs, Pipeline for Educational Programs (PEP), or Student Administrative Services (SAS).