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09-03-2010

Clarkson University Center for Advanced Materials Processing Sponsors International Symposium on Chemical-Mechanical Planarization

[A photograph for media use is available at http://www.clarkson.edu/news/photos/cmp2010.jpg]

Researchers from several high technology companies and suppliers, and universities from the United States, Japan, Korea, China, and Germany gathered in Lake Placid in August for the 15th International Symposium on Chemical-Mechanical Planarization (CMP), sponsored by Clarkson University’s Center for Advanced Clarkson University Center for Advanced Materials Processing Sponsors International Symposium on Chemical-Mechanical PlanarizationMaterials Processing (CAMP).

Chemical-mechanical planarization or chemical-mechanical polishing, CMP for short, is an enabling technology that translates into faster computers, more realistic video games, smaller cell phones and more efficient performance from the various electronic devices we use daily in our homes and businesses.

It uses nanosized abrasives in a reactive, chemical slurry to polish various layers on the surface of wafers used in semiconductor fabrication to achieve nanolevel planarity. CMP plays a critical role in today’s microelectronics industry and is the ideal planarizing technology for use with the interlayer dielectrics and metal films used in all forms of logic and memory devices.

This year’s symposium focused on several fundamental aspects of CMP, including abrasive particles, polishing mechanisms, pad behavior, flow characterization, defects and post-polish cleaning, low-k films and integration issues.

Clarkson’s S.V. Babu, distinguished university professor and director of CAMP, again served as the lead organizer of this year’s symposium.

He was assisted by co-chairs Manabu Tsujimura, director and CTO of Ebara Corporation, Japan; Donald Canaperi, senior engineer at IBM; Joseph Steigerwald, Intel fellow, Technology And Manufacturing Group and director of chemical mechanical polish technology; Jihong Choi; senior process development engineer at Global Foundries; and Jin-Goo Park, professor, Department Of Materials Engineering, Hanyang University, Korea.

Invited speakers from end-users, tool, pad and slurry manufacturers, and universities presented their research results. The symposium also included two keynote speakers.

The first keynote speaker, Clarkson alumnus Geoff Akiki, director of Abu Dhabi site development for Global Foundries, was introduced by Clarkson President Tony Collins and delivered a talk titled "From Contract to Collaboration: Delivering a New Approach to Foundry."

The second keynote speaker, Michael Fury, Techcet Group, LLC, was introduced by Clarkson Provost Thomas Young and described the early history and evolution of CMP in a talk titled "You Want to do What to my Wafer? Before CMP was Cool."

As noted by Fury, research on CMP began at CAMP in 1993 as a result of several white papers that addressed the challenges associated with the rapid growth in the application of CMP in the semiconductor industry.

These papers were a result of the early discussions between Professors Babu, Ahmed Busnaina, Raymond Mackay, Egon Matijevic, Richard Partch, and Don Rasmussen and the then IBM technical managers and researchers Mike Fury and Frank Kaufman.

In developing the CMP thrust at CAMP, this team, which was later joined by Prof. Yuzhuo Li, exploited the expertise and skills of the CAMP faculty in thin film processing, fine particle synthesis, particle coatings, colloidal chemistry, surfactants, and in the removal of particles from finished surfaces.

The CMP research activity was started in Babu’s laboratory at CAMP using a polishing tool donated by R. Howard Strasbaugh Inc. and test wafers donated by IBM, Burlington.

These initial CMP efforts at CAMP were assisted by David Campbell (formerly of IBM), who was with CAMP until 1997. In 1996, Babu organized the first (and the following 14) annual International CMP Symposiums

With excellent support from Ed McNamara, Bill America and Jack Prendergast, the meetings achieved a high level of excellence and international recognition. Li, now on leave at BASF in Germany, also played a significant and leading role in the growth of the research in this field and in organizing the symposia.

Since those early days, in addition to training many undergraduates, Clarkson has graduated more than 35 Ph.D. students and a similar number of M.S. students in this field, who now occupy leading technical and management roles at Intel, IBM, Micron, and other companies.

A poster session was also held to display the CMP research taking place at CAMP.

Clarkson University launches leaders into the global economy. One in six alumni already leads as a CEO, VP or equivalent senior executive of a company. Located just outside the Adirondack Park in Potsdam, N.Y., Clarkson is a nationally recognized research university for undergraduates with select graduate programs in signature areas of academic excellence directed toward the world’s pressing issues. Through 50 rigorous programs of study in engineering, business, arts, sciences and health sciences, the entire learning-living community spans boundaries across disciplines, nations and cultures to build powers of observation, challenge the status quo, and connect discovery and engineering innovation with enterprise.

Photo Caption: Co-organizers of the 15th International Symposium on Chemical-Mechanical Planarization. From left: Clarkson’s S.V. Babu, distinguished university professor and director of CAMP; Donald Canaperi, senior engineer at IBM; Manabu Tsujimura, director and CTO of Ebara Corporation, Japan; and Jin-Goo Park, professor, Department Of Materials Engineering, Hanyang University, Korea.

[News directors and editors: For more information, contact Michael P. Griffin, director of News & Digital Content Services, at 315-268-6716 or mgriffin@clarkson.edu.]

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