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04-13-2005

Clarkson University Boasts Two Winners Of Coveted Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships

[Photographs for newspaper use are available at http://www.clarkson.edu/news/photos/goldwater2005-bingham.jpg and http://www.clarkson.edu/news/photos/goldwater2005-marshall.jpg]

Norman J. Marshall Jr., a junior chemistry major, and Andrew T. Bingham, a sophomore mechanical and aeronautical engineering major, both from Clarkson University, have been awarded scholarships for the 2005-2006 academic year by trustees of the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation. Competition for the highly sought after scholarships is restricted to university and college sophomores and juniors from the United States.

Marshall’s field of specialization is nuclear magnetic resonance. The title of Marshall’s essay for the Goldwater Scholarship competition was “Liposome-stabilized Microbubbles as an Ultrasound Enhancing Agent: Early Cancer Detection.” The essay described how the ultrasound imaging that doctors often use to detect cancer early is dependent on differences in tissues in order to show detail in an image. His theory is that liposomes ─ microscopic, fluid-filled pouches whose walls are made of layers of phospholipids, identical to the phospholipids that make up cell membranes ─ could be agitated into micro-sized bubbles and used to enhance the image of the ultrasound. Marshall is from Orchard Park, New York. He maintains a 3.948 grade-point average.goldwater2005-bingham

Bingham’s field of specialization is aeronautical engineering. His particular interest lies in the area of manned spacecraft design. The title of his essay for the Goldwater Scholarship was “Deployment of an Interstellar Electromagnetic Acceleration System.” Bingham’s Goldwater Scholarship essay promoted the use of an external propulsion system that would take advantage of intense magnetic fields acting on the spacecraft from the outside. His system uses a series of unmanned space stations placed in planetary orbits that act as electromagnetic slingshots for the interstellar probes.  Bingham was invited to present his concept to Fellows of the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC) at their March 2005 meeting in Atlanta. Bingham is from Enosburg Falls, Vermont. He maintains a 4.0 grade-point average.

Both scholarship winners are in the Clarkson Honors Program. This program offers an intensive four-year, problem-based curriculum for exceptionally talented students. It is designed to prepare them for competitive undergraduate opportunities like the Goldwater Scholarships and get them ready to assume positions of early leadership in their careers and to thrive in the most challenging graduate programs. “Honors courses address real-world problems and our approach is open-ended and project based,” remarked David Craig, director of the Honors Program. “The Honors Program challenges its members to develop the skills necessary to excel in their careers and to leave their mark in their profession.”

Goldwater Scholars were selected from 1,091 mathematics, science and engineering students nominated by the faculties of colleges and universities nationwide. The trustees awarded only 320 scholarships. This is Clarkson’s 12th and 13th winner since the Goldwater Foundation, a federally endowed agency, was established in 1986. “In fact,” said James R. “Dick” Pratt, dean of Clarkson’s School of Arts and Sciences, “our students have been extremely successful in the competition for Goldwater Scholarships. This is the second time we have had dual scholarship winners in the past three years.” 

The curriculum and atmosphere at Clarkson University is highly collaborative. This provides opportunities for undergraduates to participate in real-world research and be mentored by accomplished researchers and professors. Faculty advisors to both Bingham and Marshall have advised previous Goldwater Scholarship winners. Kenneth Visser, associate professor of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, is Bingham’s advisor. Yuzhuo Li, professor of Chemistry, is Marshall’s advisor. “The dedication of faculty members like David Craig, Ken Visser, and Yuzhuo Li, coupled with our interdisciplinary, team-oriented teaching philosophy has worked well in producing students who excel and helps us attract the nations top students,” said Pratt.

The Goldwater Scholarship Program, honoring Senator Barry M. Goldwater, was designed to foster academic achievement and encourage students to pursue careers in their chosen mathematics, natural sciences, or engineering field. The scholarship pays for tuition, fees, books and room and board up to a maximum of $7,500 per year.

Clarkson University, located in Potsdam, New York, is an independent university with a reputation for developing innovative leaders in engineering, business and the arts and sciences. Its academically rigorous, collaborative culture involves 2,700 undergraduates and 400 graduate students in hands-on team projects, multidisciplinary research, and real-world challenges. Many faculty members achieve international recognition for their scholarship and research, and teaching is a priority at every level.  For more information, visit http://www.clarkson.edu.

PHOTO CAPTION (Marshall): Norman J. Marshall, a junior chemistry major at Clarkson University, is winner of the 2005 – 2006 Goldwater Scholarship. The scholarship pays for tuition, fees, books and room and board up to a maximum of $7,500 per year. Students are nominated for the scholarship and must submit an essay. Marshall’s essay was titled “Liposome-Stabilized Microbubbles as an Ultrasound Enhancing Agent: Early Cancer Detection.” Pictured with Marshall is his advisor, Yuzhuo Li, professor of Chemistry.

PHOTO CAPTION (Bingham): Andrew T. Bingham, a sophomore mechanical and aeronautical engineering major at Clarkson University, is winner of the 2005-2006 Goldwater Scholarship. The scholarship pays for tuition, fees, books and room and board up to a maximum of $7,500 per year.  Students are nominated for the scholarship and must submit an essay. Bingham’s essay was titled: “Deployment of an Interstellar Electromagnetic Acceleration System.” Pictured with Bingham is his advisor, Kenneth Visser, associate professor of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering.
[News directors and editors: For more information, contact Michael P. Griffin, director of News & Digital Content Services, at 315-268-6716 or mgriffin@clarkson.edu.]

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