Background Image

B.S. in Electrical Engineering

The objective of the undergraduate program in electrical engineering is to prepare students for productive careers as professional engineers and to provide a base for graduate study and for lifelong learning in new and developing specialties. We expect that within a few years after completing the program:

1. Contributing Professionals
Graduates are expected to have become contributing professionals who apply fundamental engineering knowledge and analytical problem-solving skills in a wide variety of practical applications.

2. Well-Rounded Citizens
Graduates are expected to have become well-rounded citizens who rely on their engineering education to serve society with an understanding of their professional and ethical responsibilities.

3. Effective and Responsible Collaborators
Graduates are expected to have become effective and responsible collaborators who function well in diverse team environments.  Some graduates will have emerged as leaders in their field.

4. Intellectual Growth
Graduates are expected to have exhibited intellectual growth and pursue continual innovation in their field. Those graduates who are especially talented and motivated to pursue a graduate degree should be successful at entering and completing graduate studies.

The degree program in electrical engineering fosters the achievement of these objectives in two ways. First, the curriculum as a whole is comprised of:

  • a coherent program of required courses in basic science, mathematics, and engineering science, including laboratory experience in the use of modern equipment for measurement and design;
  • education in the humanities, social sciences, ethical principles and management, with special attention to the development of effective written and oral communication skills;
  • elective coursework in several of the major subdisciplines of electrical and computer engineering, to encourage individual interests and to provide opportunity to gain further knowledge in these subdisciplines;
  • experiences that facilitate the development of problem solving, teamwork, and engineering design skills with the aid of modern analysis and design tools; and
  • experiences that encourage students to become active alumni and to develop a commitment to lifelong learning. 

Basic and required courses are taken during the first two years, along with some introductory professional courses, including an engineering laboratory. The third and fourth years include both required and elective technical courses.

The Clarkson Common Experience is addressed in the first year with the Clarkson Seminar and a course in one of the required knowledge areas. Five knowledge area and/or university courses are required over the four years of study, and one of these knowledge area courses must be in economics. The Clarkson Common Experience is designed, in part, to develop communication, problem-solving, and critical-thinking skills and an understanding of the social, ethical and economic implications of an engineer’s work.

Second, the electrical engineering program is constructed so that each student develops depth of knowledge in the discipline that is built upon mastery of material in fundamental required courses, a base of experience using state of the art software and engineering tools, the ability to design an engineering system to meet desired specifications, and the ability to communicate effectively and work effectively as a member of an engineering team. This is done through a program of study with the following outcomes.

  • In the required courses, students are expected to master the essential topics that are needed in thecourses that follow. In these courses, students are expected to gain a firm grounding in basic electricaland computer engineering (reinforced with laboratory experience) and then take a set of intermediatecourses that treat topics in signals and systems, energy conversion, electromagnetic fields, and microelectronics. Each student then develops his or her own interests further by taking a set of three advanced courses in some area of the discipline to gain depth in that area while also taking at least two courses in other areas of the discipline to ensure breadth of coverage.
  • Students gain experience in using state-of-the-art software and engineering tools. They encounter modern tools such as MATLAB and Pspice early in their program of study and continue to use these tools through several of the required courses. They are exposed to tools such as LabView and are required to gain experience in C/C++ programming.
  • Students develop their teamwork and communication skills. They do so in part through course work that requires them to communicate effectively in written form and in part through course work involving team-based design, written communication of their design decisions, and oral presentation of their work. The design experiences require that students work in teams of varying size, collaborating with others on teams with diverse membership. By participating in team-based problem solving of this kind, with individuals whom they may not have chosen as teammates, students learn to work with a diverse group of individuals in multiple situations, thereby developing their teamwork skills.
  • Students develop the ability to design an engineering system to meet desired specifications. They engage in a major design experience in which they design and build an engineering system. The specific type of system varies, as projects are chosen from various application areas relevant to the discipline. These team-oriented tasks demand that students learn to work with others in completing a system design that meets specifications on time. The system specifications may require that students interact with individuals from other disciplines to design an acceptable product.
  • Students engage in activities that foster development of an appreciation for the importance of extracurricular and community involvement. They are actively encouraged to become involved with professional societies, service organizations, and other extracurricular activities and are also encouraged to take advantage of the close interpersonal environment that the department fosters. We encourage our students to obtain significant industrial level experience prior to graduation, either through an internship or by participating in the co-op program. Additionally, we encourage our students to participate in engineering projects on campus, through under-graduate research, suitable on-campus work experience, and technical extracurricular activities such as the solar car team or the US First Robotics competition.
Electrical Engineering Curriculum
line

FIRST YEAR
(See Common First-Year Curriculum in Engineering)

line
SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester   Second Semester
Course Title Cr. Hrs.   Course Title Cr. Hrs.
MA232  Differential Equations
3
  MA231 Calculus III 
3
ES250 Electrical Science 
3
  EE211  ECE Lab I 
3
ES260  Materials Science
3
  EE221  Linear Circuits 
3
EE261  Intro to Programming and
  EE264  Intro to Digital Design 
3
  Software Design 
3
  EE324  Dynamical Systems
3
  KA/UC Elective*
3
     
line
   
line
     
15
   
15
     
line
JUNIOR YEAR
First Semester   Second Semester
Course Title Cr. Hrs.   Course Title Cr. Hrs.
MA381  Probability 
3
  EE381  Electromagnetic Fields  
EE311  EE Junior Lab 
3
    and Waves
3
EE321  Systems and Signal Processing 
3
    Math Elective
3
EE331  Energy Conversion 
3
    Area Electives
6
EE341  Microelectronics 
3
    KA/UC Elective* 
3
   
line
     
line
   
15
     
15
line
SENIOR YEAR
First Semester   Second Semester
Course Title Cr. Hrs.   Course Title Cr. Hrs.
EE412  EE Senior Design or            Area Elective 
3
  Professional Elective
3
    Professional Elective or 
  ES Elective 
3
  EE412 Senior Design 
3
  Area Electives
6
    KA/UC Elective*
3
  KA/UC Elective* 
3
    Undesignated Electives 
6
   
line
     
line
   
15
     
15

* Knowledge Area or University Course electives.
There are a total of five courses which must be taken to cover six knowledge areas. At least one of these courses must be a University course. University courses are interdisciplinary courses that cover two or more knowledge areas. One of the knowledge area electives must be an Economics course, EC350 is recommended.

See Academic Requirements for details of the Clarkson Common Experience including the First-Year Seminar, the Clarkson Seminar, Knowledge Area (KA) courses, University Courses (UC), and related requirements.

Professional Specializations
The courses offered by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering can be grouped into the following subdisciplines, with each subdiscipline including a combination of required and elective courses at the undergraduate level. A complete description of all courses, including graduate-level courses, can be found in the annual publication Courses. Undergraduate students enrolled in 500-level courses must have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0, and permission of their advisor and their department chair. To enroll in a 600-numbered course, undergraduates must have senior standing, a grade-point average of at least 3.5, and must have permission of their advisor, department chair, and the Dean of Engineering. See Professional Concentrations in Engineering.

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING EE462 Software Systems Architecture
BR400 Introduction to Biomedical EE465 Computer Graphics
  Rehabilitation Engineering EE466 Computer Architecture
  and Science EE468 Database Systems
EE485 Neural Engineering CONTROL SYSTEMS
COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS AND EE321 Systems and Signal Processing
SIGNAL PROCESSING EE324 Dynamical Systems
EE321 Systems and Signal Processing EE450 Control Systems
EE401 Digital Signal Processing EE451 Digital Control
EE404 Wireless Networks ELECTRONICS AND CIRCUITS
EE407 Computer Networks ES250 Electrical Science
EE427 Introduction to Digital EE221 Linear Circuits
  Image Processing EE341 Microelectronics
EE470 Coding and Information EE345 Microelectronic Circuit Fabrication
  Transmission EE441 Electronic Devices for IC Simulation
EE471 Principles of Digital and EE442 CMOS IC Design
  Data Communications EE446 Instrumentation
COMPUTER ENGINEERING EE447 VLSI Design
EE261 Introduction to Programming POWER ENGINEERING
  and Software Design EE331 Energy Conversion
EE264 Introduction to Digital Design EE333 Power System Engineering
EE360 Microprocessors EE430 High-voltage Techniques and
EE361 Fundamentals of Software   Measurements
  Engineering EE431 Power Distribution and Utilization
EE363 Software Components and EE436 Electric Machines and Drives
  Generic Programming EE438 Alternate Energy Systems
EE365 Advanced Digital Circuit Design EE439 Dielectrics
EE368 Software Engineering    
EE404 Wireless Networks    
EE407 Computer Networks    
EE408 Software Design for Visual    
  Environments    
EE410 Computer and Network Security