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Indeed the p-p binding concept is so successful that pi acceptors are not only being attached to inorganic and biopolymer latex particles, but are also being incorporated into the less efficient microemulsion and microgel dispersed phases discussed. All of the advances in the various approaches described have been made during 2001, and it is anticipated that in 2002 the dispersed phase giving the best in vitro result will be evaluated in vivo. Beyond restoring human health from an overdose of legally administered therapeutic agents, the research program has the potential of producing nanoparticles capable of detoxifying a wide variety of molecules used by addicts and terrorist groups.

As a result of this work, Professor Partch has been contacted by personnel at Walter Reed Army Hospital regarding possible use of his particle surface modification technology to inactivate anthrax spores in the lung by preventing them from being encapsulated by macrophage and transported through the lung membrane and into the blood.

Figure 5

Figure 5. Life-saving percent efficiency of binding (removal) of toxic bupivacaine anesthetic by silica nanoparticles with (YL31-1, YL 35-1) attached p acceptors.

For more information about Professor Partch and his research, you may call him at 315-268-2351 or send email to partch@clarkson.edu.

CAMP Professor Anja Mueller Investigates the Use of Fuel Cells as Biosensors

CAMP Professor Anja Mueller, of Clarkson University's Department of Chemistry, is investigating the influence of environmental toxins on biological energy production by using a biological fuel cell. The fuel cell is being built using the enzymes the body uses for energy generation on the electrodes as well as in solution for fuel regeneration. Energy generation is one of the two major systems in the body most commonly affected by environmental toxins. Professor Mueller's fuel cell will be a convenient screening tool for these toxins, since the toxicity of a compound can be measured as a reduction of voltage. A thorough characterization of the electron transfer at the enzyme electrodes, used in the fuel cell, will be performed by CAMP Professor Ian Suni.

 

 

Figure 6

Figure 6. Fuel Cell

For more information about Professor Mueller and her research, you may call her at 315-268-4405 or send email to muellean@clarkson.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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