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CAMP Professor Privman Models the Synthesis of Monodispersed Fine Particles

CAMP Professor Vladimir Privman, of Clarkson University's Departments of Physics and Electrical & Computer Engineering, is modeling the synthesis of monodispersed fine particles. The goals of this project also include extension of the know-how in the preparation of monodispersed colloids to nanosize particles. (See Figure 8.) In earlier work with Professor Matijevic''s group at CAMP, Professor Privman and coworkers developed a model that explains narrow size distribution in the formation of colloid-dimension (~ 1mm) particles via a two-stage growth: burst nucleation of nanosize (~ 10 nm) subunits, followed by their aggregation into larger secondary particles. The Solid State Chemistry program of the National Science Foundation, recently funded an extensive multidisciplinary research effort at CAMP. The goal of this project is to explore a broad spectrum of topics, in a unified approach, to control particle size and other properties from the nanoscale to the colloidal scale. Experimental work is being carried out by Professors Borkovec, Goia and Matijevic'. Professor Privman is coordinating the theoretical modeling component of the project, which has also received additional funding from the Petroleum Research Fund.

Figure 8

Figure 8: Calculated particle size distributions

In addition, Professor Privman is the Director of the Center for Quantum Device Technology at Clarkson University. Research at the Center will utilize the principles of quantum physics to build computers that are much smaller and faster than current models. Professor Privman has been working closely with scientists at Harvard University to create a working model of a quantum computer.

For more information about Professor Privman and his research, you may call him at 315-268-3891 or send e-mail to privman@clarkson.edu.

Dr. Dan Goia Joins CAMP's Research Team on Fine Particles

Dr. Dan Goia recently joined CAMP as a Research Associate Professor. He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1998 from Clarkson University under the mentorship of Professor Egon Matijevic' (the Victor K. LaMer Chair in Colloid and Surface Science) and has over twenty years of industrial experience in the area of fine and ultra fine particles (metals, metal oxides, pigments, drugs). For the past twelve years he managed the research and development activities of Degussa's Electronic Materials Division and since 1998 held the position of R & D Director. He extended this Directorship to Degussa-Huels' successor company "dmc2," a technological and market leader in the field of metallic particles for electronic applications.

Recent corporate achievements while Dr. Goia served as Director of R & D at Degussa-Huels and dmc2 include a novel, entirely "water-based" process to manufacture low-cost / high- performance / silver flakes, novel processes capable of producing cost effectively monodispersed precious (Pt, Ag, Ag/Pd, Au) and base metal (Ni, Cu) powders in a very wide range of sizes (50 nanometers to several micrometers), new processes capable of yielding stable dispersions of precious metal particles that can be successfully used as precursors for high-performance heterogeneous catalysts, a process capable of producing low-cost, ultra fine, highly crystalline barium titanate powder for electronic applications, and environmentally friendly processes to deposit films of precious metals onto metallic and nonmetallic substrates.

Figure 9
Figure 9
Figure 9

Figure 9: Monodispersed Metallic Particles (a. Monodispersed particles of palladium - 200 nm , b. Monodispersed particles of gold - 3 mm , c. Monodispersed particles of Ag / Pd alloy - 1.0 um).

In addition, Goia has made significant theoretical and practical contributions in the area of chemical precipitation, especially of highly monodispersed metallic particles. These materials are characterized by a high degree of control over their critical properties such as particle size, size distribution, morphology, internal structure, and composition. These metallic particles are used extensively in catalysis and electronics. (See Figure 9.) Other emerging applications for these particles are in high-density magnetic storage, decorative applications, transparent conductive coatings, ferromagnetic fluids, biology, and in medicine. Professor Goia's role at CAMP is to help strengthen existing contacts between CAMP and its industrial partners, and to initiate contacts and nurture relations with new partners in new technological fields. His plans include the establishment of a "Research Center for Metallic Particles" (a new focus area of CAMP).

For more information about Professor Goia, you may call him at 315-268-4411 or send e-mail to goiadanv@clarkson.edu.

 

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