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CAMP Annual Report: Page 10

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Clarkson University's Center for Advanced Materials Processing Sponsors the Fourteenth  International Symposium on Chemical-Mechanical Planarization

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Co-organizers of the 14th International Symposium on Chemical -Mechanical Planarization.  From left:  S.V. Babu (Distinguished University Professor / CAMP Director, Clarkson University), Lee Cook (Technology Fellow, Dow Electronic Materials), Yuzhuo Li (R&D Head for Global Business Unit Electronic Materials at BASF and Professor of Chemistry at Clarkson University) and Jin-Goo Park (Professor, Department of Materials Engineering, Hanyang University).

 

 A number of researchers from several high technology companies and suppliers and some Universities from the United States, Japan, Korea, Belgium and Germany gathered in Lake Placid during August 9 - 12 for the 14th International Symposium on Chemical-Mechanical Planarization (CMP), sponsored by Clarkson's Center for Advanced Materials Processing (CAMP).  

 

Chemical-Mechanical Planarization or chemical-mechanical polishing, CMP for short, is a process that uses nanosized  abrasives in a reactive, chemical slurry to polish various layers on the surface of wafers used in semiconductor fabrication to achieve nanolevel planarity.

 

S.V. Babu (Distinguished University Professor/CAMP Director, Clarkson University) served as the lead organizer and co-chair of the symposium and was assisted by Lee Cook (Technology Fellow, Dow Electronic Materials), Mahadevaiyer Krishnan (Research Scientist & Manager, Colloid & Interface Science - Advanced Planarization, IBM), Yuzhuo Li (R&D Head for Global Business Unit Electronic Materials at BASF and Professor of Chemistry at Clarkson University), and Jin-Goo Park (Professor, Department of Materials Engineering, Hanyang University) acting as co-organizers.

 

Chemical-Mechanical Planarization plays an increasingly important role in today's microelectronics industry. It is the ideal, and the only, planarizing technology for use with the interlayer dielectrics and metal films used in silicon integrated circuit fabrication. CMP is an enabling technology that translates into faster computers, more realistic video games, smaller cell phones and more efficient performance from the various electronic devices we use daily in our homes and businesses.

This year's Symposium focused on several fundamental aspects of CMP, which included abrasive particles,  polishing mechanisms, pad behavior, flow characterization, defects and post-polish cleaning, low-k films and integration issues, 300 mm wafer challenges and MEMS/MOEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems/micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems).

Invited speakers from end-users, tool, pad and slurry manufacturers, and universities presented their research results.  The Symposium also included three, one-hour workshops.  These tutorials were presented by Dr. Len Borucki of Araca Incorporated (Pads in all their Glory), Dean/Professor Goodarz Ahmadi of Clarkson University (Overview of Models for Chemical Mechanical Planarization), and Distinguished University Professor/CAMP Director S.V. Babu (Slurry Options and Impact on some Defects for Cu, Barrier and Dielectric Planarization). In addition, a poster session was held to display the CMP research taking place at CAMP.

Clarkson University President Anthony Collins delivered an after-dinner keynote speech. His presentation focused on "Innovation and the Economy." He also presented award plaques to Adele Connors and Sharon Williams (both of Adworkshop, Lake Placid, NY) for their excellent work with CAMP newsletters over the years.

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Award recipients display their plaques.  From left: Clarkson University President Anthony Collins, Sharon Williams (Adworkshop), Adele Connors (Adworkshop), and Distinguished University Professor/CAMP Director S.V. Babu.

 

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Sustainable Construction Materials



CAMP Professor Sulapha Peethamparan, in Clarkson University's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is carrying out research to develop sustainable construction materials by using industrial by-products such as cement kiln dust, fly ash, slag and silica fume. She is also interested in the mechanism of Portland and oil well cement hydration; the setting kinetics of cements; micro-/nano-scale characterization of cement/cementitious materials; forensic analyses of deteriorated concrete; and lime/cementitious soil stabilization. In addition, she is working on CO2 sequestration using industrial byproduct via mineral carbonation.