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Nanoadhesion and Nanoparticle Removal Techniques for Surface Cleaning

The Photo-Acoustic Research Laboratory (PAR) directed by Professor Cetin Cetinkaya has been conducting analytical, computational and experimental studies in the areas of laser-based particle removal and non-contact nano-adhesion measurements since 1999. There is an immense need in various industries for dry, non-contact removal of micro/nano-particles (especially in 100-nm range) from blank and patterned substrates. PAR Lab has developed a novel dry cleaning method to remove micron and submicron particles. The approach, based on laser-induced plasma shockwaves, is a non-contact method and the removal efficiency is an order of magnitude higher than the traditional laser cleaning methods. Recent experiments have proved that a latex particle with a diameter of 60 nm and larger particles can be removed from silicon surfaces without damage. The dry laser cleaning method is being used to remove micron and submicron particles from varying substrates as well as from micro-holes and semiconductor trenches. The research in this area at the PAR Laboratory has been supported by Intel Corporation, International SEMATECH and Praxair/Electronics.

Modeling of the Chemical-Mechanical Polishing Process

Professors Goodarz Ahmadi and S.V. Babu, in collaboration with the JSR company, are developing new models for the chemical-mechanical polishing of low-k materials.   Their analysis includes the influence of abrasive particles and pad surface micro-roughness.   Earlier, Professor Ahmadi and his students studied the effect of abrasive particle shapes, slurry pH, and colloidal forces on the CMP removal rate.

NANOSYSTEMS

Nanoparticle Work, Medicinal Chemistry, New Monomers and Polymers  

CAMP Professor Richard Partch’s research continues in three main areas: 1)nanoparticle synthesis and surface modification; 2) medicinal chemistry for control of chemical overdoses; and 3) new monomers and polymers

having potential for use in composites. Some details are as follows.

  • Mixed polymer/metal oxide core shell submicron particles are being prepared by group members Tania Tannahill, Deborah Shipp and Lauren Gaskell for study by collaborator CAMP Professor Babu for potential applications in CMP. Two separate projects are funded by BASF and by Micron.

Metal flakes obtained from collaborator CAMP Professor Goia or from commercial sources, and carbon nanotubes obtained from NanoDynamics, Inc., have been optimized by chemical processes, followed by freeze drying in collaboration with CAMP Professor Rasmussen for use as IR obscurants. Justen Schaefer, Nathan Victor, Matt Kelly and Nick Downey in the Partch group, as well as Dr. Sudha Rani at NanoDynamics have done the experimental work leading to materials the U.S. Army may seek production of for field use.

Decolorization of dispersions of various carbon materials, including carbon black, nanotubes, fullerenes, graphite, etc, by pulsed laser treatment results from reduction in particle size as well as surface chemical changes. These phenomena, investigated by David Eno and Deborah Shipp in the Partch group, may have applications in the field of optical limiters.

  • Antidotes for commonly overdosed chemicals and even biotoxins continue to be evaluated by Partch group members Visiting Professor Abeer Albawab (Ph.D., Clarkson, Friberg) from Amman Jordan, NSF- REU scholar Nathan Handley and by Lauren Gaskell. Chemical principles leading to previous success in binding three prescription therapeutics and of cocaine have now been shown to apply to binding high risk acetaminophen (Tylenol), Ibuprofen and bisphenol A, as well as to tyrosine, an amino acid at the opening of the active site of the toxic protein Ricin.
  • Dental resin shrinkage during photocuring in a carie may be reduced or eliminated as a result of research carried out with collaborator CAMP Professor
    Shipp. New monomers and polymers compatible with commercial resin chemicals have been prepared by group member Kamel Omrane (M.S., 2006) that exhibit the desired property.

Clarkson University’s Center for Advanced Materials Processing Sponsors the Twelfth International Symposiun on Chemical-Mechanical Planarization

More than 100 of the world’s premier researchers, academics, high technology companies and suppliers gathered in Lake Placid August 12 – 15 for the 12th International Chemical-Mechanical Planarization (CMP) Symposium, sponsored by Clarkson’s Center for Advanced Materials Processing (CAMP).

Chemical-Mechanical Planarization or chemical-mechanical polishing, CMP for short, is a process using nanoabrasives in a reactive, chemical slurry to polish the surface of wafers used in semiconductor fabrication to achieve nanolevel planarity.

Clarkson Distinguished University Professor/CAMP Director S.V. Babu served as the leading organizer and co-chair of the symposium. Additional co-organizers included Dr. Manabu Tsujimura, Managing Executive Officer and Deputy Group Executive of Ebara Corporation in Japan, Dr. Paul Fischer, Advanced CMP Group Leader of Intel Corporation, Dr. Laertis Economikos, Senior Technical Staff Member Unit Process Development of IBM, and CAMP Professor Yuzhuo Li.

Chemical-Mechanical Planarization is playing an increasingly important role in today’s microelectronics industry. It is the ideal, and the only planarizing technology for use with the interlayer dielectrics and metal films used in silicon integrated circuit fabrication. CMP is an enabling technology that translates into faster computers, more realistic video games, smaller cell phones and smaller, more efficient performance from the electronic devices we use daily in our homes and businesses.

This year’s Symposium focused on several fundamental aspects of CMP, which included particles, polishing mechanisms, pad behavior, flow characterization, defects and post-polish cleaning, low-k films and integration issues, 300 mm wafer challenges and MEMS/MOEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems/micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems).

Invited speakers from end-users, tool, pad and slurry manufacturers, and universities presented their research results. In addition, Dr. Robert Villetto, Jr., 300 mm Lab Operations Process Engineering Manager, Albany NanoTech, IBM, gave an after-dinner presentation. His talk was titled “Alliance Strategy & Technology Challenges at 45/32 nm.”

From left: Distinguished University Professor/CAMP Director S.V. Babu, after dinner speaker Dr. Robert Villetto, Jr., 300 mm Lab Operations Process Engineering Manager, Albany NanoTech, IBM, Dr. Manabu Tsujimura, Managing Executive Officer and Deputy Group Executive of Ebara Corporation in Japan, and his wife Kumiko.

Clarkson University’s Center for Advanced Materials Processing (CAMP) sponsored the 12th International Chemical- Mechanical Planarization (CMP) Symposium held in Lake Placid, New York, August 12 – 15. Co-Chairs of the Symposium were (L-R) Distinguished University Professor/CAMP Director S.V. Babu,

Dr. Paul Fischer, Advanced CMP Group Leader of Intel Corporation, Dr. Manabu Tsujimura, Managing Executive Officer and Deputy Group Executive of Ebara Corporation in Japan, and CAMP Professor Yuzhuo Li

 

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