THE RESEARCH
 

CAMP's Annual Technical Meeting 2001

PARTICLE SIZE ANALYSIS AND THE USE OF PARTICULATES IN ADVANCED MATERIALS PROCESSING

Professor Don Rasmussen has published extensively in the areas of nucleation and growth of new phases and on techniques to study nucleation and particle growth processes. Currently his research is focused on the study of characterizing concentrated colloidal systems, depositing thin films and modifying binder systems for high temperature ceramics. His ongoing experimental projects include (1) measurement of the dynamic light power spectrum from concentrated colloidal systems using a fiber optic probe (being developed to study particle breakdown, aggregation or growth in concentrated systems.), (2) determination of the particle size from the shape of the power spectrum and the particle concentration from the integrated power spectral density, (3) controlled precipitation of nanoscale alumina from bauxite liquors, (4) nucleation and growth of particles in supersaturated systems ( both aerosols in vapors and particles in supersaturated liquors ), and (5) the characterization of the hardness and surface properties of CMP polishing pads by surface energy determination and measurement of hardness using nanoindentation resistance.

Granular Flows and Materials

CAMP Professor Hayley Shen, of Clarkson University's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is investigating granular flows in terms of constitutive relations, flow rate effects, particle size and shape effects. She is also interested in two-phase flows. Professor Shen submitted two proposals about granular flows to NASA. ("Transitional Granular Flows" was submitted to the NASA Space Station Program on Jan. 12, 2001. "Constitutive Relation in Transitional Granular Flows" was submitted to the NASA Microgravity Complex Fluids Program on May 12, 2001.) These proposals involve collaborations with Tohoku University and Saitama University
(Japan), and the University of Florida and Clarkson University.

 

Professor Shen recently made the following conference presentations. ("Plastic to Nonlinear Viscous Transition of Constitutive Relations for Granular Materials - Sample Size Effect," presented at the Powders and Grains 2001, Sendai, Japan, May 2001. "Random Voids and Constitutive Relations for Two-Dimensional Dense Granular Materials," presented at the ASCE-ASME-SES Joint conference on Mechanics and Materials 2001 (MMC2001), San Diego, June 2001.) Her paper "Sample Size Effects on Constitutive Relations of Granular Materials" appears in the October 2001 issue of the Journal of Engineering Mechanics.

MAGNETOSTRICTION AND CYCLIC PLASTICITY

Reverse magnetostriction has been identified as a deformation mechanism in the low plastic strain amplitude fatigue behavior of nickel. Professors David Morrison and John Moosbrugger, working with graduate student Yan Jia, have been studying the links between dislocation substructure evolution and the mechanical behavior of nickel during fatigue type loading at low plastic strain amplitude. They have recently found that anomolies in the shapes of the stress- plastic strain hysteresis loops can be explained on the basis of the magnetostriction of nickel. All ferromagnetic materials exhibit strain due to an applied magnetic field, the so-called Joule magnetostriction. In reverse magnetostriction, the imposition of a normal stress induces magnetization along with an accompanying magnetostriction. In nickel, a tensile stress causes net domain magnetization perpendicular to the stress axis, while a compressive stress causes domain magnetization parallel to the stress axis. The result is that at low plastic strain amplitudes, hysteresis loops are constricted due to the magnetic component of inelastic strain that is not dislocation-based. Experiments performed on specimens in the presence of a magnetic field strong enough to maintain nearly fixed domain magnetization under tension-compression cycling showed that these constrictions could be eliminated.. In this case nickel will behave much like copper, which produces analogous dislocation substructure in fatigue type loading and which is diamagnetic at room temperature.

CAMP's Annual Technical Meeting 2001

CAMP Sponsors and Affiliates

Corporate Sponsors
Corning*
Ferro Electronic Materials*
IBM*
Kodak*
Xerox
*
Corporate Members
Ebara
  Technologies   Incorporate
Metabolix
NYACOL
 Nano   Technologies
,Inc
PPG Industries,
Inc
Praxair*

Rodel, Inc
Saint Gobain

 

  Industrial Ceramics
SpeedFam-IPEC
W.R. Grace &   Company
New York State Associates *
Advanced Vision Technologies, Inc.
Applied Image Group
Buffalo Wire Works Co., Inc
DeFelsko
Corporation
Ferronics

 

Incorporated
Indium Corporation of America
REYNOLDSTECH
Unifrax
Corporation
Universal Photonics, Inc.
ZecalCorporation
Corporate Affiliates
Advanced Refractory Technologies, Inc.*
Akzo Nobel* Alcoa*

American National Can
Artisan

 

Textiles* Baker
BASF*
Becton Dickinson Branson
Bristol-Myers*
Burleigh Instruments Incorporated*
Coulter
Crest Ultrasonics
CVC Products Inc*
Degussa-Hüls* Dow Chemical DuPont*

 

Eastman Chemical* Engelhard Corporation* Flame Tech
General Electric Corporate Research & Development*
Hyperion
ICI Surfactant
IIMAK*
Intel
Micrus* NanoSystems* DYNEA
Noranda
Ocular Research Petrolon
Procter & Gamble*

 

SC Johnson Semiconductor Research Center (SRC) Shipley
Solid State Equipment Corporation
Strasbaugh
Texaco*
Government Sponsors
New York State Office of Science , Technology, and Academic Research (NYSTAR)

 

Department of Energy

National Science Foundation

New York State Energy Research and Development Authority
_______
* New York State

 

The CAMP newsletter is published four times per year by the Center for Advanced Materials Processing, a NYSTAR-designated Center for Advanced Technology located at Clarkson University.
Editor: Dana M. Barry.
Equal Opportunity Policy. Clarkson University does not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, color, creed, religion, national origin, age, disability, sexual orientation, veteran or marital status in provision of educational opportunity or employment opportunities and benefits.

Center for Advanced Materials Processing
Clarkson University
Box 5665 Potsdam,
New York 13699-5665

S.V. Babu, Director and Vice Provost (babu@clarkson.edu)
Edward P. McNamara, Deputy Director  (mcnamara@clarkson.edu)
Phone: 315-268-2336, FAX: 315-268-7615, e-mail: leila@clarkson.edu
web site: http://www.clarkson.edu/camp

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