THE RESEARCH

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Nanosystems

RECOGNITION FOR PARTICLE SURFACE MODIFICATION ACTIVITIES

The CAMP research group mentored by Senior University Professor Richard Partch, well known for achievements in surface modification of particles with continuous coatings, as well as with covalently attached gradient functionalities, has received recognition at several professional meetings and by two funding units. The group is currently using a variety of chemistries to improve the industrial utility of nano and micropowders for use in electronic, imaging, printing and medicinal applications. Evon Powell, an M.S. student in the group won first place at the May, 2001 CAMP Annual Meeting for his poster on synthesis and characterization of molecules and particles designed for potential use to remove overdose therapeutic drugs in vivo. The technology involves the selective ability of electron deficient acceptor units to form complexes with the drugs of concern. He also presented orally at the August, 2001 National ACS Meeting in Chicago. Chris Syvinski, also an M.S. student mentored by Professor Partch, placed in the top twelve poster presenters out of over one hundred in the session held by the Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry at the ACS Meeting in Chicago. His poster was on coating needle shaped organic pigment particles with titania to help prevent bleaching by sunlight.

Projects by others in the Partch group involve surface modification of nanoparticles for use in CMP, ink jet printing and in capacitors.

Professor Partch has been recognized by Eastman Kodak Company to select and mentor the first Kodak Graduate Student Fellow to study at Clarkson. This challenging responsibility is funded for up to five years and involves research in the area of printing technology. Professor Partch has selected Carolynn Mosenteen, (a chemistry major at Clarkson University) for the prestigious position.

Finally, the International Commission on Atomic Energy has invited Professor Partch to mentor a funded scholar from Argentina on coating radioactive particles for use in medicine.

ELECTROCHEMICAL DEPOSITION OF METALS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR APPLICATIONS / DEVELOPMENT OF NEW NANOTECHNOLOGIES

Professor Ian Suni is investigating electrochemical deposition of metals for semiconductor applications and for the development of new nanotechnologies. One current CAMP project in collaboration with ReynoldsTech in Syracuse, New York, is investigating electrodeposition of noble metals onto III-V semiconductor materials for communications applications. This team is also simultaneously investigating an electrochemical method for depositing a Cu seed layer on top of the Ta barrier layer during interconnect formation on Si devices. Another effort related to semiconductor processing is the development of an electropolishing method for copper planarization during Si device fabrication. Electrochemical methods for reproducibly fabricating metal nanoparticles and metal nanowires are also being developed.

CAMP's Annual Technical Meeting 2001

 

 

 

 

QUANTUM PHYSICS FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY AND INFORMATION PROCESSING

CAMP Professor Vladimir Privman, of Clarkson University's Departments of Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering, is the Director of the Center for Quantum Device Technology. He is exploring implications of quantum physics for future nanotechnology and information processing. He has also contributed to theories of uniform fine particles. Professor Privman's main contributions have been in developing and evaluating approaches to utilize semiconductor heterostructures and quantum wells, based on the silicon-chip device technology, for quantum information processing (quantum computing). He has also worked in modeling electron transport of relevance to single-quantum measurement and control

ADVANCED TRANSPORT MODELS FOR MODERN MOS DEVICES

Professor Ming-Cheng Cheng has been studying the advanced transport models for modern MOS devices to account for extreme non-equilibrium states of electrons and holes including quantum transport phenomena of charge-carriers in the device channel. The investigation will lead to a better understanding of non-equilibrium charge carrier transport in modern MOS devices and may result in more accurate and efficient transport models for device simulation. In addition Professor Cheng's group is studying thermal flow in SOI (silicon-on-insulator) devices and HBTs (heterojunction bipolar transistors) including self-heating in static and dynamic situations. The objectives of this work are to understand the self-heating effect on the electronic characteristics of SOI devices and HBTs and to develop efficient and accurate thermal circuit models for these devices taking into account self-heating for microelectronic circuit simulations.

Supporting Technologies

EXTRUDERS

Professor Greg Campbell, director of CAMP's Extrusion and Mixing Consortium, continues to develop a more descriptive analysis for screw pumps, augers, and extruders. Over the past year much of his group's effort has been focused on the conveying of particular solids with these devices. In addition, his group is working to understand structure development in concentrated two phase systems. They found that bimodal dispersions act quite differently from single particle size systems. Also they have an actual program focused on understanding the reactions and physical changes that occur in an epoxy which forms liquid crystalline structures

ADVANCED FACTOR ANALYSIS METHODS

As a way of understanding the nature of the interactions among components within their consumer products, Unilever, Inc. has examined materials using systems that produce multivariate images. Professor Philip Hopke and his group have examined skin care products, soap bars and several other types of consumer products. Using advanced factor analysis methods developed in conjunction with Professor Philip Hopke's research group, these images are being analyzed to determine the spectra of the components as well as their relative concentrations across the image. Professor Hopke's group has developed several new algorithms that provide both higher speed and superior performance in accurately resolving such complex mixtures.

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